Caution: The Jack Henry design system is currently in an alpha state. Designs, code, and documentation may change at any time without warning. The system is presented for testing purposes only.

February/March update

February and March have seen us doing some re-architecting of the core library, fine-tuning a relevant set of test components, as well as making a milestone with how we research and document high-level topics.

Core

During the last few weeks, we made the decision to break out our icon set into its own library. While there were some benefits to including our icons as part of the core library—in particular, reducing the number of libraries to manage—it quickly became apparent that it was going to create headaches that far outweighed the benefits. One major headache that was resulting was the need to update the versions of both the entire core and potentially the web libraries every time a minor icon update was made. As a result, we set up icons as their own library so that they can be independently updated from and ultimately reduce the number of updates to the other libraries.

Components

We finished a comprehensive review of the first iteration of our components. This review identified ways we could streamline the components both in their usability and architecture so that they were more consistent as well as beneficial for the majority of our users. From that review, we identified a handful of components that would make good candidates for the next round of refinements. Over the last couple of months, we finished the design and specifications for that initial batch of components which includes button, card, list item, list group, icon, and divider. These components were chosen to allow testing of basic card structures. Once they are completely coded, these components will allow our internal testing partners to begin prototyping with them in more practical ways and provide helpful feedback.

Documentation

A major focus has been placed on developing our request for comment (RFC) documentation process. The RFC process allows the team to thoroughly research, document, and discuss high-level topics and considerations for the system. Our first RFC focused on developing standards for accessible keyboard navigation throughout our components.

What’s next

Our major focus is starting work on the new base theme. This will involve a review of the current color tokens that are place and ensuring that they provide a comprehensive and flexible scaffold with which teams can style and theme their products.

We are also starting to look into some updates to our tooling workflow that could create a stronger bridge between design and engineering, reducing the amount of manual updates required and creating an easier-to-manage single-source-of-truth. One such example is managing all of our design tokens within Figma and automating the process of how they get added to Style Dictionary.